Buying Baseball Tickets Online

May 31, 2015
Isn’t it great to be able to buy tickets for a ball game while still wearing a robe and drinking coffee? I remember when I was a younger Orioles fan and had to use the telephone or the box office, and that’s one thing I don’t yearn for when fans talk about the “good old days”.

The best part is the choices you have; you can buy tickets through any of dozens of different outlets, and they have to compete for your entertainment dollar.

Since it’s part of my job to help you get the best deal on tickets, here’s a few options that you have on the Internet when buying, with some advantages and disadvantages of each.


1) The Team Website. All teams make tickets available on their websites, but they use different providers like Ticketmaster or Tickets.com, so the experience can be different with each. You can pick the actual seat with some of them; with most all teams you can see the view from your section.

Advantages: It’s the most trusted source for tickets; teams offer group tickets and multi-game packs; you can sign up for deals with newsletter alerts; you can see the view from your section and sometimes choose your exact seat; you can load tickets onto your smartphone with some teams; dynamic pricing generally favors people who buy early.

Disadvantages: Annoying surprise “fees” that jack up the cost; many times the best deal on tickets is elsewhere; and dynamic pricing increases cost of tickets when demand goes up.

When to use it: Use the team website when you’re getting high demand game tickets and are buying well ahead of time, or when you want to filter games by opponents or promotions. The team website is often the best way to select a game that suits you, but it’s not always the best deal.


2) StubHub. StubHub is the official ticket reseller for Major League Baseball (in case you’re like my brother and are asking “what the heck is StubHub”?). Some teams, like the Yankees, don’t have an “official” relationship with them, but you can still get tickets there.

I use StubHub a lot, more than I use team websites, but that’s partly because it suits my purposes.

Advantages: As trustworthy a source as any and tickets are guaranteed; fees are included in the visible cost of the ticket rather than added after you click “Buy”; great deals can often be had for low demand games; you can select sections and price range as filters and see available tickets.

Disadvantages: Selection often isn’t as great as from the team website; demand can drive prices way up; significant fees, even visible, are still added to the cost of the ticket.

When to use it: Use StubHub for the best selection of tickets for medium or low demand games; often as the game nears the deals will be better there. Also use StubHub if you’re uneasy about other outlets, since it’s the official ticket marketplace for almost every team and the tickets are guaranteed.


3) SeatGeek (and other ticket search engines). I am a fan of SeatGeek, and I’m not just saying that because they’re an affiliate of mine. SeatGeek searches dozens of third party ticket providers…VividSeats, RazorGator, Crowd Seats and many others, and it lists all of the available tickets for you…with a “Deal Score” that shows the value. When you click on “buy”, it takes you right to that website’s checkout.

Like with StubHub, SeatGeek will show you the full price with any provider’s fees included, so there are no surprises.

Advantages: Possibly the best deals you can find at set prices (although you should compare what’s available to StubHub); the “Deal Score” allows buyers to get the best value; buyers get an even better picture of the market than on StubHub.

Disadvantages: Some of the dealers listed on SeatGeek get less than stellar reviews, causing buying apprehension, although most are legit; StubHub and eBay aren’t SeatGeek partners, so one must compare; SeatGeek’s limitations don’t always allow it to include the fees in the cost.

When to use it: Try SeatGeek in comparison with StubHub; very often you will find better deals on SeatGeek, as I have a few times. The risk is low, but Google the seller reviews if you’re concerned.


4) ScoreBig. If SeatGeek is the Expedia of ticket buying, then ScoreBig is the Priceline…ScoreBig allows you to choose an event and place a bid on tickets, and they will tell you how good your chances are of the bid being accepted. If the offer is not accepted, you are locked out of bidding on that seating area for 24 hours.

There are also no fees; the price you see is the price you pay.

Advantages: Buyers can decide exactly how much they want to pay; it’s an easy and worthwhile risk to try and beat the lowest price elsewhere.

Disadvantages: The bid is a commitment; if it is accepted the money is taken out of your account immediately; you also can’t pick your seat or row, only the actual seating area.

When to use it: If you’re not picky about what row you sit in, try ScoreBig to see if you can do better than other sites. Or try a low bid for the heck of it…you may get lucky and there’s nothing to lose.


5) Craigslist. Craigslist is like a modern classified section of the newspaper…sellers list their tickets and buyers contact them and arrange the exchange. I’ve said more about buying tickets on Craigslist here.

Advantages: No fees for the service provided, making tickets cheaper; great deals can often be had with sellers desperate to unload tickets.

Disadvantages: No guarantees about the seller’s legitimacy; exchanges with strangers can be shady and even dangerous; buyer has no recourse with counterfeit tickets.

When to use it: When you’re feeling adventurous and are willing to take a chance for a great deal, Craigslist might work for you. It’s best to buy from season ticket holders, which you can verify through the team. I’ve talked more about Craigslist here, if you want a better understanding of the risk.


There you go; five outlets for buying tickets online and what I believe are your best reasons for using all of them. If you want to know more about how each outlet applies to a particular team, and more about the different seating areas of a ballpark, be sure to get yourself one of these!

 

Should I Buy Tickets On Craigslist?

March 1, 2015



Sports fans love to tell the story of the great deal they scored on tickets once...be it through a scalper, great timing on StubHub, a classified ad, whatever. We love it. It makes us feel so much smarter than the suckers who paid three times the price for the same seats.

Frequently when I am poring through ballpark reviews, one or two folks will talk about getting their tickets on Craigslist, and saving a bundle of cash.

In case you’ve never used it, Craigslist is a website that falls somewh...
Continue reading...
 

Baseball Fan Mistakes I Used To Make

January 3, 2015
Since I've started researching everything there is to know about various baseball venues, I've learned a lot. Some things have saved me money, some things have saved me time, and some things have saved me a lot of aggravation.

Even I still don't always get it right going to a game, but I've definitely learned to avoid certain pitfalls. Here's a list of four mistakes I used to make in my misspent youth...

1) Buying tickets from the team website. By itself, this isn't always the worst thing to do...
Continue reading...
 

Which Ballpark Has The Best Food?

December 13, 2014


With ballparks featuring a full menu these days, I am asked this question by almost every radio show that is generous enough to have me on. It’s a fun question and I don’t mind answering it, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t a challenge.

Truthfully, since there are items worth trying and not worth trying at every venue—and since they almost all have some version of nachos, pizza, cheesesteaks, burgers, and of course, unusually topped hot dogs—you can probably find something that’s a...
Continue reading...
 

Try A Local, Bad Beer at the Game

December 10, 2014

Ballpark beer is so ridiculously priced nowadays that I’ve been staying sober at the game. It’s just not worth it to me; I’ll be a designated driver and get my free soda or have a few at a nearby tavern.

I suppose the plus of this is fewer inebriated people at the game; just Google “Ten Cent Beer Night” to learn what can happen when 50,000 sports fans can afford unlimited alcohol. And apparently some fans will still pay $9 for a Coors Light; far be it for me to stop them.

Many teams h...
Continue reading...
 

New Book About Old Comiskey

August 9, 2014
Looks like my buddy Floyd Sullivan at ChicagoNow, author of the endearing and humorous fan essay "Waiting For The Cubs" (see my review of that book here), has written a new book about the old Comiskey Park.

Well, I guess you can just call it "Comiskey Park" now, since the "New Comiskey Park" is now called "U.S. Cellular Field".

Check out Old Comiskey Park: Essays and Memories of the Historic Home of the Chicago White Sox, 1910-1991 here.

Continue reading...
 

A Universal Ballgame Parking Tip

July 30, 2014
In two recent ballpark outings, in Boston and Baltimore, I have learned that not only has the price of parking at a ballgame escalated, but also that the price is higher for high demand games these days.

Thankfully in Boston I always know better than to drive to Fenway Park; I know traffic in Kenmore Square on game day and parking prices are going to be insane. This last visit was no exception, but even I was surprised at what some lots almost a half mile away from the ballpark were charging. ...
Continue reading...
 

The Wrigley Rooftops Need Better Legal Counsel

July 9, 2014


I have been keeping up with interest on the ongoing saga that is the Cubs vs. Wrigley Rooftop owners. The latest story, other than the Rooftop owners offering a “two sign” concession to the Cubs, is that the recent Rooftop defamation lawsuit against a local sports consultant was thrown out of court.

When you get a suit thrown out of court that quickly, you’ve probably put up a weak argument. At least, that’s the perception.

If you’re unfamiliar with the background of this, briefly, t...
Continue reading...
 

Reaching 203

June 28, 2014


Joe Mock at the Rickwood Classic in Birmingham, Alabama

Fans whose yearly vacations revolve around a baseball road trip probably know the name Joe Mock. If they don’t, they should.

Mock is the author and webmaster at Baseballparks.com, the premier website for baseball roadtrippers. He is also the author of 2001’s "Joe Mock's Ballpark Guide", a delightfully illustrated book about the 30 MLB parks in use at the time. He regularly contributes to USA Today’s Sports Weekly about the North Amer...
Continue reading...
 

Cool New Stuff at Citizens Bank Park

March 28, 2014
It’s pretty cool to park in Lot S at Citizens Bank Park, even if there isn’t a ballgame going on.

Lot S is the Media Lot, and yes, expert that I am on all things Citizens Bank Park, I didn’t know that either.

Thanks to Ken Dunek and JerseyMan Magazine, and to the kindness of the Philadelphia Phillies, I was invited to a Phillies 2014 Media Event, where the Phillies and the nice Aramark folks tell hungry newspeople what’s new at the ballpark this year. Oh, and to share hot dogs with chee...
Continue reading...
 
blog comments powered by Disqus
Get a FREE eBook... sign up for the Ballpark E-Guides Newsletter!
Follow BallparkEGuides on Twitter
Live in South Jersey and want to play ball?

Make a Free Website with Yola.